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“[W]e have to understand where communications fell short, where recovery took too long, and what changes can be made to make our networks more resilient before the next unthinkable event occurs,” said FCC Acting Chair Jessica Rosenworcel.
“As the state moves forward with its aggressive and laudable plans to ensure all Californians have access and the means to use broadband and wireless services, we must also collaboratively discuss the quality of those services,” said Amy Yip-Kikugawa, Acting Director of the Public Advocates Office.
“The company would prefer to work with all contractors,” said Frontier technician Tom Gardella to the LA Times. “[But] the contractors aren’t as invested as the employees. We’re in it for the quality because we’re in this for the long term. They’re in it for the piece-work.”
Newly elected Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick is one of the Governors who recognize the importance of expanding high speed internet access. Hear what he said during a recent radio discussion on the topic.
This is just a taste of the great work being in Vermont, as far as making sure people are aware of just what they'd be losing in Verizon's ill-conceived plan to sell to FairPoint.
As the new chair of the Energy and Commerce Committee, Rep. John Dingell (D-MI) is among the most important political leaders in Washington when it comes to improving our nation's Internet policies. A recent article in The Hill shows he's out front on these issues, pointing out the need for "a comprehensive national strategy" of high-speed Internet access.
The United States is alone among major developed nations in its utter lack of a comprehensive plan for high speed internet access. Not only are many Americans missing out on the benefits of high speed internet, but as a country we are at risk of falling behind in the global economy. U.S. Rep. Edward Markey, D-Mass., understands the problem.
In Indiana, lawmakers are pursing a mapping strategy to analyze and document the state's digital divide.
It snows a lot in Western Massachusetts, and although the residents can deal with foul weather, their satellite dishes--the only option for internet access faster than dial-up--cannot. According to Florida Town Administrator Susan Brown, "If it snows, I have to have my road foreman de-ice it. The other day, he was throwing salt up at the dish so I could use the Internet to check the upcoming weather forecast."
If Verizon has its way, Vermont's telephone and internet provider will soon become FairPoint Communications, a company that won't be able to provide high-speed services to rural New England.
Twenty percent of Kentuckians don't have technology as simple as a computer, a printer and an Internet connection in their homes. This leaves the children of that 20 percent out in the cold when it comes to keeping up in school.