News

After repeated incidents and multiple grievance filings, the members walked off the job in protest. As a result of the strike, the supervisor has been temporarily suspended.
Dubbed “the most dangerous job in America,” tower climbing involves scaling towers to perform inspections and tests, handle repairs, and install equipment ranging from antennas, amplifiers, and fiber optic cable, to lighting systems. The major carriers who build and own the towers often farm out the maintenance work to contractors like Qualtek.
The report, “What Lies Beneath,” focuses on Google Fiber, a high-profile company that relies heavily on contractors, and offers a deep dive into contracted out work.
The workers say the company is hiring too many outside contractors and bargaining in bad faith in negotiations that have been ongoing since March.
The report finds that the most influential telecommunications companies and related trade associations spent more than $234 million on lobbying and federal elections during the 116th Congress—an average of more than $320,000 a day.
FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel joined CWA President Chris Shelton, CWA District 4 Vice President Linda L. Hinton, and members of CWA’s Build Broadband Better project to discuss how the FCC is addressing the pressing need for affordable, reliable broadband service through the Emergency Broadband Benefit, and what CWA members are doing to help promote broadband access in their communities.
The television and digital advertising campaign educates the public and legislators about the importance of making sure that broadband infrastructure is built by skilled union workers and not low-wage contractors.
An investigation by CWA found that the company has failed to maintain its physical copper plant and has failed to deploy fiber to 46 percent of its coverage area in Minnesota.
The President’s Executive Order calls for the Federal Trade Commission to limit or ban non-compete agreements and for the FCC to prevent exclusivity deals or collusive arrangements that leave tenants with only one option for internet service.
AWU member Phares Lee tried for three years to have his deadname removed from his badge and was told by HR there was no remedy. On June 1, the union launched a petition demanding that Google create a chosen names policy that allows all workers to choose the names displayed on their badges.