News

Union planned to picket Democratic presidential debate due to longstanding labor dispute.
Union makes significant investment in new organizing staff and resources aimed at helping technology and game workers across North America fight for better working conditions.
The New York State Call Center Jobs Act states that any call center company with 50 or more full-time or full-time equivalent workers that has taken loans, grants, or tax breaks from New York State will forfeit those benefits if they move 30% of their jobs overseas.
This week, Information Week explores an important issue: while high-speed Internet access is growing in the U.S., we're not keeping up with the rapid pace of Internet growth around the world.
Telemedicine administered via videoconferencing has the potential to help children suffering from cancer, worldwide. It already is in some places, thanks to programs that orchestrate videoconferencing between experts in varied fields related to pediatric oncology with children in developing countries, who otherwise would not have access to such expertise.
The Workers Independent News interviewed CWA President Larry Cohen for their special radio report about Speed Matters.
Look out avatars, there's a new kid on the block. He's a few years older than your average teenage computer geek, prefers a grey suit to cargo pants, and is slightly more political. His name is Congressman George Miller, and he chose to take his message beyond the grounds of Capital Hill and into the virtual world of Second Life.
Newly elected Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick is one of the Governors who recognize the importance of expanding high speed internet access. Hear what he said during a recent radio discussion on the topic.
This is just a taste of the great work being in Vermont, as far as making sure people are aware of just what they'd be losing in Verizon's ill-conceived plan to sell to FairPoint.
As the new chair of the Energy and Commerce Committee, Rep. John Dingell (D-MI) is among the most important political leaders in Washington when it comes to improving our nation's Internet policies. A recent article in The Hill shows he's out front on these issues, pointing out the need for "a comprehensive national strategy" of high-speed Internet access.
The United States is alone among major developed nations in its utter lack of a comprehensive plan for high speed internet access. Not only are many Americans missing out on the benefits of high speed internet, but as a country we are at risk of falling behind in the global economy. U.S. Rep. Edward Markey, D-Mass., understands the problem.