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This haphazard retirement of DSL without alternatives available is the outcome of the FCC’s 2018 Order relaxing consumer protection standards around the IP transition.
“There is a huge swath of communities along the westside of Fresno County that lack basic infrastructure for broadband,” said Stan Santos, a splicing technician for AT&T and a member of CWA Local 9408. “As the incumbent local exchange carrier, my employer, AT&T, is directly responsible for this failure to connect our communities to broadband.”
“CenturyLink continues to try to shirk its responsibility to over 100,000 New Mexicans who rely on the company for residential phone service, particularly in rural areas” said Brenda Roberts, CWA District 7 Vice President. “Fortunately, New Mexico has not adopted the deregulation agenda being pushed by corporations who are more interested in serving their big stockholders than their customers.”
Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps writes an op-ed for the Washington Post, demanding action on a national broadband Internet policy.
The research is in: Americans can't live without broadband Internet.
The state of Kentucky knows the facts: investing in high speed internet brings high paying technology jobs. And building a high speed internet infrastructure is an investment in the economy.
Government leaders, union representatives, educators and concerned citizens recently met at a public forum in Vermont. Congressman Bernie Sanders hosted the event to discuss the lack of high speed internet in rural communities.
This past September, at the tail end of the legislative session, Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY) introduced a landmark bill to expand our high speed internet infrastructure: Rural Broadband Initiative Act of 2006.
CWA's Speed Matters brochure is now available at http://files.cwa-union.org/speedmatters/SpeedMattersBrochure.pdf
House calls were once considered a thing of the past, but with specialists in high demand in rural America, psychiatrists are using telemedicine to treat patients in their own homes.
For our nation's deaf, finding easy ways to communicate throught the channels the rest of us take for granted has been a constant challenge -- but that's changing. High speed internet has made new video conferencing tools possible, opening new and exciting doors of dialogue.