News

Technician Brigade members will fight for local subcontractor transparency policies.
Arizona Corporation Commissioners questioned Frontier CEO Nick Jeffery on the unequal treatment of tribal workers amid the company's failure to meet its Arizona broadband deployment targets.
A new report issued by the AFL-CIO, its 30th annual Death on the Job Report, reveals that every day, on average, 275 U.S. workers die from hazardous working conditions. CWA Local 3808 member Eric Chapman, an AT&T worker in Nashville, spoke at an AFL-CIO press event about two CWA members from his local who recently died – deaths that the union believes could have been prevented.
As the new chair of the Energy and Commerce Committee, Rep. John Dingell (D-MI) is among the most important political leaders in Washington when it comes to improving our nation's Internet policies. A recent article in The Hill shows he's out front on these issues, pointing out the need for "a comprehensive national strategy" of high-speed Internet access.
The United States is alone among major developed nations in its utter lack of a comprehensive plan for high speed internet access. Not only are many Americans missing out on the benefits of high speed internet, but as a country we are at risk of falling behind in the global economy. U.S. Rep. Edward Markey, D-Mass., understands the problem.
In Indiana, lawmakers are pursing a mapping strategy to analyze and document the state's digital divide.
It snows a lot in Western Massachusetts, and although the residents can deal with foul weather, their satellite dishes--the only option for internet access faster than dial-up--cannot. According to Florida Town Administrator Susan Brown, "If it snows, I have to have my road foreman de-ice it. The other day, he was throwing salt up at the dish so I could use the Internet to check the upcoming weather forecast."
If Verizon has its way, Vermont's telephone and internet provider will soon become FairPoint Communications, a company that won't be able to provide high-speed services to rural New England.
Twenty percent of Kentuckians don't have technology as simple as a computer, a printer and an Internet connection in their homes. This leaves the children of that 20 percent out in the cold when it comes to keeping up in school.
The long journey toward getting high speed internet to America's heartland continues.
California, arguably the technology capital of the world, has taken another step forward by eliminating fees for the installation of high speed fiber optic lines along state rights of way.