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“Although the FCC Order acknowledges the merger will likely lead to store closures and job loss, the FCC fails to protect workers with employment-related conditions,” said Debbie Goldman, CWA Research and Telecommunications Policy Director.
The lawsuit undermines T-Mobile’s commitments to rural communities as it prepares to defend itself in another lawsuit by the attorneys general from the District of Columbia and 15 states challenging the proposed T-Mobile-Sprint merger.
The outage prevented hundreds of 911 calls from reaching emergency operators.
“The abusive and predatory practices alleged in the new lawsuit are a disturbing indictment of T-Mobile’s management and reinforce CWA’s continued concerns about the impact of the proposed T-Mobile-Sprint merger, especially on workers and low-income consumers,” said Debbie Goldman, Research and Telecommunications Policy Director for CWA.
History has shown us that we cannot just trust carriers to keep their word when it comes to protecting consumers during the transition to digital, and no American deserves to be left behind in the digital era.
The letter expresses concern that the proposed T-Mobile-Sprint merger “will mean the loss of American jobs, cuts in wages and commissions, and a corresponding reduction in quality to our customers” and requests “solid and verifiable assurances that the New T-Mobile will not discard the front line workers who have made T-Mobile and Sprint so successful.”
“There is broad agreement that the USF programs are working, and that the Commission’s proposal risks undermining their success,” wrote Brian Thorn of CWA. “Rather than cap USF funding, the Commission should reform the outdated Universal Service Fund contribution mechanisms.”
“CWA members’ spirit and solidarity over the last four days showed the company that we would not back down until they bargained with us in good faith,” said CWA District 3 Vice President Richard Honeycutt. “This was a historic strike that showed the power that working people have when they join together.”
“We came to investigate where AT&T is sending its calls. We knew a lot were going to the Philippines. What we’ve found is that AT&T is preying on workers here. They’re getting paid less than $2/hr and don’t have basic rights,” said Natalie Santiago, Executive Vice President of CWA Local 3122 in Miami, Florida.
“We entered these negotiations prepared to bargain in good faith with AT&T to address our members’ concerns and to work together to find solutions,” said CWA District 3 Vice President Richard Honeycutt. “Our talks have stalled because it has become clear that AT&T has not sent negotiators who have the power to make decisions so we can move forward toward a new contract.