Consumer Protections and Good Jobs

The joint Reply Comments support the FCC's proposal to update the Lifeline program and offer specific recommendations to promote the affordability of broadband services for low-income families.
Verizon told the FCC it spends less than one percent of the average phone and DSL customer?s rate on upkeep of the network.
The Washington, DC Public Service Commission took steps to protect DC residents in the IP transition from copper networks to fiber, directing Verizon to inform customers about the specifics of the transition and maintain copper networks for customers who want that service.
In a letter to the NYPSC, Schneiderman explained that reports and public hearings aren't enough. A formal proceeding in front of an administrative judge is required "to fully understand the impact of deregulation on consumers and businesses."
In public hearings convened by the New York Public Service Commission across the state, elected officials and community leaders sent a clear message: Verizon is leaving our communities behind.
The rallies come after Verizon, which makes $1 billion in profits every month, has refused to bargain constructively with its 39,000 employees over the terms of its contract, continuing to insist on the ability to outsource more jobs, increase health care costs by thousands of dollars a person and slash retirement security. Verizon also refuses to build the FiOS network throughout New York while abandoning proper maintenance on the traditional telephone network.
A group of twenty lawmakers sent a letter to the CEO of T-Mobile?s parent company, Deutsche Telekom, asking the German company to address T-Mobile?s repeated labor law violations.
More than 140 warehouse and shipping workers have asked the Teamsters to represent them in negotiations for better wages, safer working conditions, and fairer employment agreements.
The Rate Counsel filed a petition seeking an investigation into a threatening letter Verizon sent its customers and an appeal of another agency's decision to end state regulation of Verizon?s pricing and service.
Twenty-nine consumer organizations signed a letter to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler urging the agency to establish clear rules to protect customers as communications companies phase out their traditional copper wire service.