Diversity

New York City plans to replace public pay phones with a network of high-speed, multi-purpose Wi-Fi kiosks called Links.
Michael Scurato of the National Hispanic Media Coalition posted the following much-needed blog on the updating of the Lifeline program.
A new analysis found that in some cities as many as 40 percent of all households have no Internet. And the median ? among 176 cities sampled ? is over 20 percent without Internet.
"Tellingly just 4 percent of U.S. Amazon managers are black, although 15 percent of the U.S. Amazon workforce is black,? wrote Tech Crunch.
CWA wrote to FCC Chair Tom Wheeler saying, "Putting fiber deeper into rural areas supports the Commission's goals to get higher-speed networks connecting rural schools, libraries, and health centers.?
Students without home Internet flood the branches ? especially in low-income areas of the metro. And frequently have to wait or receive outdated and inadequate computer equipment.
A new report on the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) highlights successes in Arkansas and California.
According to the Minority Media and Telecom Council, the abysmal racial employment percentages in today's high-tech industry ?closely resemble the statistics of the broadcasting industry in the late 1960?s.?
"Instead of finding ways to deny telephone access to the neediest Americans, lawmakers should be looking to expand Lifeline to include broadband internet."
A new report from Working Partnerships USA shows that Silicon Valley's wealthy tech industry depends on low-paid Black and Hispanic workers for its essential menial work.