Entertainment and Gaming

Google is in just four markets with well less than 100,000 customers and the incumbent telecom companies are outpacing Google?s buildout.

65 percent of OTT viewers watch a subscription service like Netflix, 30 percent watch a free service like YouTube, and five percent use a transaction service like iTunes.
Somehow Netflix -- a vocal advocate of full transparency on the Internet -- thinks it doesn?t have to follow those same rules.
Public Knowledge?s petition will test Comcast?s tenuous argument and prompt a response from the FCC to clarify the net neutrality rules. That clarification is important as more ISPs introduce zero-rating plans to entice cord-cutters.
The FCC has initiated a rulemaking designed to give consumers alternatives to the cable and satellite companies? set-top box. That?s a good thing. But the devil is in the details, and the debate is shaping up to be a battle between corporate titans.
In offering more online video content, especially if that content is exclusive to YouTube?s service, YouTube will become a clear competitor of video streaming providers like Netflix and Hulu.
This disruption of the cable bundle is prompting important questions about the future of video services: are these plans precursors of new models for financing network investment and what will it all mean for consumer choice?
T-Mobile is introducing a new video plan to allow ?unlimited? streaming of selected video service. But consumer advocates say the plan may violate the FCC's new net neutrality rules.
As some companies like Verizon and DISH Network begin experimenting with smaller bundles, some industry experts think the market has already passed them.