Libraries

?Connectivity is a path to greater opportunity,? the initiative?s announcement read. ?In today?s world, broadband and fluency with technology fuel economic growth, provide access to the world?s knowledge, promote skill development, and build stronger and more connected communities.?
Public libraries are increasing their role in community broadband adoption, according to a recent National Digital Alliance Inclusion report.
CWA and the AFL-CIO, civil rights groups, public interest and consumer organizations, education advocates and library associations all filed comments at the FCC urging the agency to modernize the low-income subsidy program to support broadband services, quality standards, and to establish a neutral third-party eligibility verifier.
A broad range of groups supported modernization of the Lifeline low-income subsidy program in comments filed in response to the Federal Communications Commission?s (FCC) proposal to update the Lifeline program to include broadband. Modernizing the program, the groups agreed, would help achieve the program?s goal of delivering modern communications services to low-income families, allowing full participation in 21st century life.
According to a new ALA report, libraries have generally increased broadband speeds but "just 2 percent of all libraries meet national benchmarks established by the FCC."
The New York Public Library will help to bridge the digital divide by allocating 10,000 Wi-Fi hotspots to low-income families.
School officials in Tennessee have found that merely handing out iPads and Chromebooks does not in itself close the digital divide.
FCC Commissioners Clyburn and Rosenworcel indicate support to extend Lifeline universal service to broadband.
The FCC approved further modernization of its E-rate program, and raised the Connect America Fund?s benchmark speed to 10/4 mbps, moves immediately praised by CWA and other organizations.
CWA today congratulated the FCC on its move to raise the annual cap on E-rate funding by $1.5 billion.