Minnesota

A Minn. telco represented by CWA won an award for its GigaZone project, an initiative to bring high-speed Internet to 5,000 square miles of rural Minnesota.
Although Minnesota broadband access grew significantly in the last six months, large swathes of the state's rural population still remain unconnected.
Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton names task force to promote ?border-to-border? broadband and cell phone access.
In order for Minnesota to meet its goal of providing every home and business with access to high-speed Internet, it needs to address the issue of the state's urban-rural divide, according to a new report.
On Wednesday, December 15, the Communications Workers of America and the Speed Matters campaign released the 2010 Report on Internet Speeds in all 50 States.
Speed Matters' partner One Economy was awarded $28.5 million in grant money to expand high-speed Internet in underserved communities in the latest round of NITA's Broadband Opportunity funding.
U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke recently announced the latest round of economic stimulus awards totaling $357 million for expanded high-speed Internet access. Nine states received record funding for broadband expansion. Nine states - California, Florida, Indiana, Louisiana, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wisconsin - received funding from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.
Between December 22 and December 31, The Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced an additional twenty broadband mapping and planning grants in eighteen states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
The Minnesota broadband task force issued a new report that outlines a path to expand broadband throughout the entire state. The goal: download speeds of 10-20 Mbps and upload speeds of 5-10 Mbps available to all Minnesotans by 2015.
Rural businesses need broadband access to compete - no matter what they're selling. In rural Minnesota, the tourism and real estate industries are finding themselves at a disadvantage in an increasingly web-based marketplace.