Missouri

As Andrew Schwartzman, long-time public interest media advocate, points out in his daily blog post, Google?s Kansas City project only benefited some.
AT&T is adding seven new cities to its 75 Mbps service, using existing copper wire broadband networks.
AT&T is challenging dominant cable operator Charter for high-speed broadband service in the St. Louis area, mirroring similar broadband competition elsewhere.
Google's much-publicized high-speed fiber project in Kansas City seems to be bypassing many low-income residents.
The number of city mayors supporting AT&T's $39 billion bid for T-Mobile climbed to 102 from 24 states. That number is in addition to 26 governors and 11 state attorneys general.
On Wednesday, December 15, the Communications Workers of America and the Speed Matters campaign released the 2010 Report on Internet Speeds in all 50 States.
Speed Matters' partner One Economy was awarded $28.5 million in grant money to expand high-speed Internet in underserved communities in the latest round of NITA's Broadband Opportunity funding.
The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced its second round of grant awards for broadband mapping programs in Alaska, Colorado, Delaware, Kansas, Louisiana, and Missouri.
The US Department of Agriculture released a report that compared job growth in rural areas that adopted broadband at the start of the decade with areas that lack broadband. The conclusion: broadband helps communities and businesses create good-paying jobs. Yet, according to the USDA study, only 41 percent of rural households had broadband connections in 2008.
States and localities across the country are beginning to assess their broadband gaps, hoping to tap into the $7.2 billion in federal funding for high-speed Internet expansion in the economic stimulus bill. Speed Matters will keep you updated as we learn more about the grantmaking process and plans in states and communities.