Private-Public Partnership

?Connectivity is a path to greater opportunity,? the initiative?s announcement read. ?In today?s world, broadband and fluency with technology fuel economic growth, provide access to the world?s knowledge, promote skill development, and build stronger and more connected communities.?
Links allow users to make domestic calls, connect to gigabit wireless Internet service, view city maps, and contact emergency services.
Pressure grows on Verizon as NYC Council examines Verizon?s broken promise to build-out high-speed FiOS network.
Which cities and specific technologies are still unknown, but modern solutions for safety, lighting, transportation, and parking are expected to be an aspect of the partnership between AT&T and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
All communities need high-speed networks, but what?s a city to do when the local provider refuses to invest in next-generation broadband? Look at models that work.
School officials in Tennessee have found that merely handing out iPads and Chromebooks does not in itself close the digital divide.
New York's de Blasio administration won approval to replace its system of public pay phones with a network of high-speed Wi-Fi kiosks, called Links.
In his blog on November 20, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler addressed expanding high-speed broadband into rural areas through both the E-rate program and the Connect America Fund.
New York City plans to replace public pay phones with a network of high-speed, multi-purpose Wi-Fi kiosks called Links.
A new federal report shows growth in mobile Internet, but at the same time "... found that 28 percent of households still do not use broadband at home."