Public Safety

The FCC released a report highlighting the cost-saving measures in its proposal to rollout a public safety broadband network. More advanced wireless networks will help mitigate communications problems during crises that were exposed during the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
As the federal government announces its plans to award the second round of broadband stimulus funding, telecommunications companies are concerned that it targets duplicate projects, instead of expanded high-speed service for unserved areas.
The FCC announced its key broadband agenda items for the coming year — outlining the steps it plans to take to strengthen high-speed Internet availability in the United States.
Nearly one-third of Americans age 14 or older used a public library computer or wireless network to access high-speed Internet in the past year, according to a report produced by the University of Washington Information School.
President Barack Obama commended the FCC on its release of the National Broadband Plan and its framework for providing universal high-speed Internet and expanding technological opportunity in low-income communities.
The Communications Workers of America issued a statement in support of the National Broadband Plan's goals of providing universal high-speed Internet and a renewed focus on digital literacy. Many other public interest organizations also came out in support of the FCC's plan.
Private industry financing of broadband must increase in order to meet the United State's aggressive broadband adoption and deployment goals, according to a new Brookings Institution study. The FCC has estimated that it will require $350 billion to provide universal broadband coverage in the U.S.
In order to achieve universal broadband, the Universal Service Fund should be used to ensure nationwide access to high-speed Internet, according to the FCC. Currently, voice service is guaranteed to every American - regardless of geographic region or income level - through the universal service fund, but that right is not extended to broadband Internet connections.
Some low-income residents in parts of Los Angeles will soon have high-speed Internet to thank for their whiter teeth and brighter smiles. A new telemedicine project piloted by the University of the Pacific will provide dentists with the capability to electronically review patients in underserved San Fernando Valley communities.
The FCC will propose up to $25 billion in new federal spending for high-speed Internet lines and a wireless network for police and firefighters, according to the Wall Street Journal.