Universality

In his blog on November 20, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler addressed expanding high-speed broadband into rural areas through both the E-rate program and the Connect America Fund.
This week, the FCC adopted a notice of proposed rulemaking designed to protect consumers in the transition from copper, circuit-switched to IP based networks.
?The Communications Workers of America supports FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler's proposal to raise the cap on E-Rate funding."
New York City plans to replace public pay phones with a network of high-speed, multi-purpose Wi-Fi kiosks called Links.
When President Obama called for reclassification of broadband as a Title II service, AT&T said it would delay building out its GigaPower U-verse service.
A new report from the U.S. Census Bureau reaffirms that although 78.1 percent of Americans have access to high-speed Internet, many are still left out.
Michael Scurato of the National Hispanic Media Coalition posted the following much-needed blog on the updating of the Lifeline program.
According to a new study by John Horrigan, the introduction of cellular hasn't eliminated either the need or desire for universal service, reliability, and connection quality.
A new analysis found that in some cities as many as 40 percent of all households have no Internet. And the median ? among 176 cities sampled ? is over 20 percent without Internet.
CWA wrote to FCC Chair Tom Wheeler saying, "Putting fiber deeper into rural areas supports the Commission's goals to get higher-speed networks connecting rural schools, libraries, and health centers.?