Verizon

Two Massachusetts mayors have sent letters to Verizon urging the company to bring FiOS service to their communities.
Citing instances of substandard service quality, the CPUC voted to examine the condition of AT&T and Verizon copper networks in the state.
The FCC found that the transfer of ownership was likely to benefit the public interest through increased investment in local networks and broadband services, and therefore imposed no conditions on the sale.
Verizon told the FCC it spends less than one percent of the average phone and DSL customer?s rate on upkeep of the network.
The Washington, DC Public Service Commission took steps to protect DC residents in the IP transition from copper networks to fiber, directing Verizon to inform customers about the specifics of the transition and maintain copper networks for customers who want that service.

Not only did the story report the company?s broken promises, it questioned whether Verizon has chosen to bypass less affluent neighborhoods.

The money will help the carriers expand 10/1 Mbps broadband service to a combined 3.4 million homes and businesses in rural locations across 36 states.
Verizon today became the only major U.S. telecommunications company to turn down federal funding to build broadband in unserved, primarily rural, communities, leaving many residents in eight states and the District of Columbia without access to vital communications options. The company was offered $568 million over six years by the Federal government to bring broadband to 270,000 locations.
In a letter to the NYPSC, Schneiderman explained that reports and public hearings aren't enough. A formal proceeding in front of an administrative judge is required "to fully understand the impact of deregulation on consumers and businesses."
In public hearings convened by the New York Public Service Commission across the state, elected officials and community leaders sent a clear message: Verizon is leaving our communities behind.