News

A local OTMR ordinance in Louisville, Kentucky was disastrous, with dangerous mistakes made by contractors. Pole attachment work is complex, and if done incorrectly, can cause electrocution or poles to fall.
A Law360 analysis found that ISPs are not consistently honoring the voluntary FCC pledge to Keep Americans Connected.
CenturyLink's fiber-to-the-home service is capable of providing symmetrical speeds of up to 940 Mbps.
Tomorrow, consumers and workers will rally in Portland Maine's Monument Square, where they'll demand fairness from the telecommunications industry.
New lyrics to an old song get to the heart of the need for high-speed internet. Check it out, then sing along!
4th Coming, an interactive role-playing game, has spread quickly to game fans around the world. The game has spread to a larger scale than creator Marc Frega might have dreamed. This is about more than entertainment. It's about the possibilities that emerge from the world of interconnectedness that comes with increased high-speed Internet access.
Minnesota is facing a problem not uncommon to states these days. Rural residents are being left in the dust when it comes to access to high speed internet services. Affirming this claim is a report from the Center for Rural Policy and Development, a nonprofit based in St. Peter, Minnesota. The organization, which evaluates issues from a rural perspective, recently published their 2006 Rural Internet Study analyzing internet accessibility in rural versus urban areas.
Clint, TX may only have 1,000 residents, but, like other small towns in Texas, it's being opened up to new opportunities thanks to high-speed Internet.
We've been keeping an eye on Verizon's proposed sale of 1.5 million Vermont land lines to FairPoint Communications, and the likely negative impact it will have on high speed internet access in rural New England. FairPoint, it seems, is in no position to build the infrastructure needed to bring high speed internet to rural communities.
Little by little, Internet access is changing the way Americans live and work. In Arkansas, for instance, technology is helping speed up the criminal-justice system.
Indigenous dancers and drummers from Brazil, Ecuador, Mexico, Florida and Alaska recently performed for one another during a week long conference. Not one of the dancers had to buy a plane ticket, stay in a hotel, or miss work.