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Telehealth visits increased from 15 percent in 2019 to 40 percent in 2020.
The Emergency Broadband Benefit Program directs the FCC to reimburse eligible carriers $50 per month ($75 per month on Tribal lands) to provide discounted broadband service and $100 per eligible household reimbursement for a connected device.
CWA and The Utility Reform Network (TURN) had raised concerns about Frontier’s intention to follow through on promised investment to improve service.
CWA has serious concerns that this transaction could curtail service availability from TracFone, one of the largest providers of Lifeline services in the country. In addition, the transaction raises significant antitrust concerns, which could negatively affect consumer prices and workers’ wages in the wireless industry.
“GAO has found that the high-cost program has been woefully maintained, with basic governance structures either wholly missing or outdated, effectively being left to rot under Chairman Pai’s leadership,” said House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone, Jr.
“As a traditional part of the peaceful transfer of power—and as part of our oversight responsibilities—we strongly urge the agency to only pursue consensus and administrative matters that are non-partisan for the remainder of your tenure,” wrote Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ) and Communications and Technology Subcommittee Chairman Mike Doyle (D-PA).
Representatives Katie Porter and Lou Correa, who represent the area in Congress, have contacted AT&T management to demand that AT&T do more to protect workers from exposure to the coronavirus.
“The question of protecting Lifeline subscribers from possible harms, and securing for them the benefits promised by Verizon in the Application, should be central concerns to the Commission in considering whether the Application serves the public interest, convenience, and necessity,” wrote Public Knowledge, Benton Institute for Broadband & Society, and the Open Technology Institute at New America.
Labor and community leaders call for policies that push private companies to bring next-generation broadband to all communities, and protect workers’ rights to join unions.
"The digital divide isn’t new, but the pandemic makes it an emergency. People's livelihoods and their children’s education should not be held hostage by a broadband provider. Congress must act to transform our nation by ensuring affordable, high-speed broadband access for all, regardless of race, income, or geography," wrote Chris Shelton and Angela Siefer.
CWA filed comments with the CPUC rebutting T-Mobile's claim that the CPUC does not have jurisdiction to review wireless transactions and to impose job conditions.