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“[W]e have to understand where communications fell short, where recovery took too long, and what changes can be made to make our networks more resilient before the next unthinkable event occurs,” said FCC Acting Chair Jessica Rosenworcel.
“As the state moves forward with its aggressive and laudable plans to ensure all Californians have access and the means to use broadband and wireless services, we must also collaboratively discuss the quality of those services,” said Amy Yip-Kikugawa, Acting Director of the Public Advocates Office.
“The company would prefer to work with all contractors,” said Frontier technician Tom Gardella to the LA Times. “[But] the contractors aren’t as invested as the employees. We’re in it for the quality because we’re in this for the long term. They’re in it for the piece-work.”
Although download speeds vary significantly, upload speeds are almost universally terrible.
Whole sections of a city, county or state may only have marginal access but be considered as `broadband accessible.'
Earlier this month, our Japanese comrades in Union Network International provided us with a thorough overview of high-speed networks in Japan.
California Broadband Task Force member Charles Giancarlo speaks out about the importance of a high speed internet policy.
A few days ago, the State of California took an important step forward for millions of Americans who lack access to the communication infrastructure of the 21st century
According to a new Nielsen/NetRatings survey, 78% of home internet users have broadband.
Millions of Americans think that they have high speed Internet - but most aren't getting what they're paying for.
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will try to implement a nationwide broadband network for health care providers.