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“From fighting the ‘real names’ policy, to opposing Project Maven, to protesting the egregious, multi-million dollar payouts that have been given to executives who’ve committed sexual harassment, we’ve seen first-hand that Alphabet responds when we act collectively. Our new union provides a sustainable structure to ensure that our shared values as Alphabet employees are respected even after the headlines fade,” said Google Program Manager Nicki Anselmo.
CWA and AT&T will also extend their COVID-19 work from home agreement.
CWA, TURN, and Frontier announced a proposed settlement to resolve the CPUC review of Frontier’s bankruptcy plan, which includes a $1.75 billion investment in infrastructure to improve service quality and fiber deployment to 350,000 locations in the state.
The report by Common Sense and Boston Consulting Group lends important guidance and an added sense of urgency for Congress and states to address the unequal access students and teachers face.
The bill requires the New York Public Service Commission to assess and map the availability, reliability, and affordability of high-speed broadband Internet access within New York.
“You can set your watch to T-Mobile’s consistency on betraying workers,” said CWA President Chris Shelton. “Practically before the ink has dried on these commitments to the CPUC, the company is already finding a way to shirk its responsibilities.”
The settlement requires Frontier to spend at least $10 million over four years to improve service quality in Minnesota and to refund $750,000 to customers.
"We understand that for many businesses, the only response to the economic downturn resulting from the COVID-19 public health emergency has been to shutter their doors and lay off workers. We object, however, to corporations using the pandemic as justification for continuing to make anti-worker decisions that are aimed at boosting share price," the senators wrote.
The bill will protect call center workers across the state by denying state grants, loans, and tax breaks to companies who move taxpayer-funded Mississippi call center jobs out of the country.
The four-year extension agreement covers 17,000 wireline employees in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas.
Millions of working families don’t have access to high-speed broadband or are unable to afford it, a crisis that is exacerbated by the pandemic.