News

This is the first time management has attempted to cancel Christmas break for the workers who are organizing to build power and join their AT&T IHX colleagues in other areas in forming a union with CWA.
The CWA Broadband Brigade and local activists have been mobilizing to ensure states eligible to receive federal funding Build Broadband Better by creating good union jobs and closing the digital divide.
“The team at Tower Safety is setting an example for workers across the industry who deserve dignity, respect, and safety,” said CWA President Chris Shelton. “For far too long, cell phone tower climbers have been taken advantage of by the big telecom companies who avoid responsibility by subcontracting the work.”
CWA will be active in the regulatory review process to preserve good jobs for its members and quality service for consumers.
The bipartisan infrastructure bill will invest $65 billion in our country’s broadband network and ensure that companies who receive these funds adhere to high labor standards.
The Trump-era Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) allowed 39 of the nation’s most profitable companies, including T-Mobile, to pay $0 in federal income tax from 2018 through 2020.
CWA played a crucial role in defeating CenturyLink/Lumen’s petition to weaken regulations. A report by CWA found that the company has failed to maintain its physical copper plant and has failed to deploy fiber to 46 percent of its coverage area in Minnesota.
Verizon’s pledge to preserve affordable rates and continue existing services follows a lengthy campaign by CWA and public interest allies.
With 39 percent of households in Lumen’s footprint lacking access to broadband, CWA and NDIA demand Lumen invest in next-generation networks and its highly skilled union workforce.
The workers say the company is hiring too many outside contractors and bargaining in bad faith in negotiations that have been ongoing since March.
The report finds that the most influential telecommunications companies and related trade associations spent more than $234 million on lobbying and federal elections during the 116th Congress—an average of more than $320,000 a day.