News

With 39 percent of households in Lumen’s footprint lacking access to broadband, CWA and NDIA demand Lumen invest in next-generation networks and its highly skilled union workforce.
The workers say the company is hiring too many outside contractors and bargaining in bad faith in negotiations that have been ongoing since March.
The report finds that the most influential telecommunications companies and related trade associations spent more than $234 million on lobbying and federal elections during the 116th Congress—an average of more than $320,000 a day.
FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel joined CWA President Chris Shelton, CWA District 4 Vice President Linda L. Hinton, and members of CWA’s Build Broadband Better project to discuss how the FCC is addressing the pressing need for affordable, reliable broadband service through the Emergency Broadband Benefit, and what CWA members are doing to help promote broadband access in their communities.
The television and digital advertising campaign educates the public and legislators about the importance of making sure that broadband infrastructure is built by skilled union workers and not low-wage contractors.
An investigation by CWA found that the company has failed to maintain its physical copper plant and has failed to deploy fiber to 46 percent of its coverage area in Minnesota.
The President’s Executive Order calls for the Federal Trade Commission to limit or ban non-compete agreements and for the FCC to prevent exclusivity deals or collusive arrangements that leave tenants with only one option for internet service.
AWU member Phares Lee tried for three years to have his deadname removed from his badge and was told by HR there was no remedy. On June 1, the union launched a petition demanding that Google create a chosen names policy that allows all workers to choose the names displayed on their badges.
The Office of the Attorney General for the District of Columbia alleged that AT&T overcharged District taxpayers millions of dollars by failing to comply with its long-term contract for cell phone and Internet services.
The Government Accountability Office found that unclear federal guidance on FCC's role in disaster response might have caused confusion and delays.